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Can a foreigner own property and home in China?


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#1 MrFantabulous

Posted 14 June 2008 - 01:54 PM

Are property and home ownership in China only allowed for Chinese citizens? (keeping in mind that "private ownership" is a fairly new concept in China).  

I think I could more easily by a home and property in China. . get something nicer for my limited funds.  Even to have a place say in the mountains near Chengdu would be nice. . .I could rent it out or use it for a summer getaway.  

How about if I am married to a chinese woman?  I'd be be afraid to put everything in her name in case things go belly-up.. would rather have it in my name. ..What about the political stability of longterm ownership?    This is after all the same country that took so much land a real estate away from landlords during the communist era and redistributed it among everyone.  A lot of those people never regained their wealth.  ANd how about doing this as an investment?  We all know chinese economy is growing perhaps faster than any other world economy.

Also I've heard of foreigners being sent out of beijng recently because they didn't have a university degree, only a diploma. .even thought they may have been working here 6 years and their employers want them to stay.  So I wonder would having a chinese wife make a difference?  Is it something the VISA people might take into consideration before giving us the boot?

#2 Nordlys

Posted 14 June 2008 - 02:19 PM

View PostMrFantabulous, on 2008-06-14 20:54:49, said:

Are property and home ownership in China only allowed for Chinese citizens? (keeping in mind that "private ownership" is a fairly new concept in China).

I thought you can only lease property in China, Chinese or foreigners.   :unsure:

#3 yohan

Posted 14 June 2008 - 02:33 PM

YES

As a foreigner you can own a part of a company in China, which is owning the land, most houses bought by foreign diplomats or businessmen in a secure complex in Beijing for foreigners are based on such a contract.

Unlike Thailand you do not need grey shareholders, a government related company created for such a case will act as the shareholder to keep control over the land.
I know European businessmen, who 'BOUGHT' their accomodation in Beijing in such a complex, and even after they left China, but unwilling to sell, they were renting it out to other foreigners, legally correct by Chinese laws.

I do not think, this works everywhere in China, however. Only for some special selected housing area for foreigners I guess in some major cities?

I heard from Chinese people, that you can BUY condominiums under some certain rules. The Chinese person I was talking with a while ago was from Shanghai.

I think, it works only with some big buildings, or similar like in Thailand, in village similar complex, with percentage of land...

Also foreigners who were living in Beijing told me, it is possible to BUY and RENT for Chinese citizens (sometimes even for foreigners) under certain restrictions - what they told me is similar to a companyLtd, where the Chinese government keeps the majority similar to a silent shareholder.

As you said, it is not really ownership, but something like that.

#4 Nordlys

Posted 14 June 2008 - 02:47 PM

View Postyohan, on 2008-06-14 21:42:58, said:

As you said, it is not really ownership, but something like that.

Yes, that's what I heard.  
That all land in China belongs to the state (or people as they may call) so you can only lease land/property for maximum 100 years or so.  I think I heard that from an American lawyer practicing in Shanghai.

#5 MrFantabulous

Posted 15 June 2008 - 05:27 AM

Hmm well that all doesn't sound too promising.  I'm not really interested in a lifetime lease on some kind of foreigners living quarters.  I was interested in owning actual property or house, in rural china.

Jack Fancy, do you have something to add to this?  I remember you were looking at some properties in Sichuan.  

D

#6 mbk

Posted 16 June 2008 - 01:12 AM

View PostMrFantabulous, on 2008-06-15 12:27:53, said:

I was interested in owning actual property or house, in rural china.

I don't see much difference between a one hundred year lease and owning a property. Do you plan to live longer than a hundred years? If you have a Chinese kid, just pass the lease on to him after you're dead.

#7 yohan

Posted 16 June 2008 - 05:11 AM

View PostMrFantabulous, on 2008-06-15 14:27:53, said:

....interested in owning actual property or house, in rural china.
Please keep in mind that the rural area of China is terrible, there is nothing there for a foreigner to enjoy a good life...
Even courier services will refuse to deliver materials to you, almost no goods, very basic medical care, often difficult connections to a major city.

Plenty of men around in rural areas, working with their bare hands for a very basic living.
If lucky, they make USD 50,-/month...often unable to send children to school, if they have family...but many Chinese men in rural areas are either old, or single...facing a life in harsh condition, poverty everywhere...

#8 sceadugenga

Posted 16 June 2008 - 07:15 AM

What would be happening in HK then where lots of property was owned by locals and foreigners?
Will it eventually revert to the State?

#9 yohan

Posted 16 June 2008 - 07:50 AM

The Chinese Government is not in a hurry with this question.
HK has a special status and mainland Chinese cannot enter into HK as they like...

China is more interested to boost the importance of other ports along the coast...Dalian, Shanghai, Ningpo and others. After some decades, Hongkong will be not less and not more important for China than any other big Chinese city, which is operating a major port for goods into and from mainland China.

China is not interested to cut down the living standard in Hongkong, but more to improve the present conditions of all major cities along the coast to make them competitive with Hongkong.

#10 MrFantabulous

Posted 16 June 2008 - 10:42 AM

View Postyohan, on 2008-06-16 00:11:42, said:

Please keep in mind that the rural area of China is terrible, there is nothing there for a foreigner to enjoy a good life...
Even courier services will refuse to deliver materials to you, almost no goods, very basic medical care, often difficult connections to a major city.

Plenty of men around in rural areas, working with their bare hands for a very basic living.
If lucky, they make USD 50,-/month...often unable to send children to school, if they have family...but many Chinese men in rural areas are either old, or single...facing a life in harsh condition, poverty everywhere...

I was thinking more along the lines of a summer/retirement home not far away from Chengdu.  Many poeple in Chengdu go to the mountains in the summer to escape the heat. . especially the elderly.  THey live simply during that time.  Chengdu is a major tourism city so any real estate around the city is likely to go up in value over time.  ANd it would be an affordable place to retire.

There is always the danger of earthquakes. . but 100 years of pressure was just let off recently, probably wont be another big one for quite a while... still wise to build an earthquake proof place.
D

#11 Jack Fancy

Posted 16 June 2008 - 01:34 PM

Well, I can't speak for other cities but here in Lanzhou a foreigner can buy a home with a one time payment.  It's just as safe and secure as a Chinese citizen owning a home here.

Mr. Fab... If you marry a Chinese citizen than you will be able to renew your visa every year although you won't be able to "work" without the proper work visa.

I bought a house here in Lanzhou with my wife but it's all in her name as we didn't buy it in one shot.  Even after the scare of earthquakes near Chengdu, I'm still interested in and looking at buying a house there.... actually, still looking AT Dujianyan... Call me crazy but I like that town...

And Yohan is right about HK... Mainland China is doing what they can to not only make the other ports richer, but also expanding manufacturing plants towards the NW area... Thusly, the RMB became stronger than the HK dollar sometime last year...

Rural might not be the right word.  Looking to stick around in China, Fab?

#12 yohan

Posted 17 June 2008 - 05:16 AM

View PostJack Fancy, on 2008-06-16 22:34:55, said:

Well, I can't speak for other cities but here in Lanzhou a foreigner can buy a home with a one time payment.  It's just as safe and secure as a Chinese citizen owning a home here.
.....
I bought a house here in Lanzhou
I would like to ask you, if you could give us more details about what kind of house (including landtitel?) you are able to buy as a foreigner or as Chinese national.

I doubt, that you can buy any kind of house somewhere in all China as a foreigner, there are restrictions...

But what kind of restrictions?

For example, like condominium (I know, foreigner can buy that) or houses located in a 'village', which has sub-land-titel (I know, that foreigner can buy that also)

But I doubt, that any foreigner can show up in any village and buy there a farm-house from some poor people.

Is there a minimum price, minimum category like in Malaysia?

Thanks for information

#13 Jack Fancy

Posted 22 June 2008 - 12:40 PM

For sure you can't buy anywhere as is true with a Chinese National... For example, there are places just for Communists.  Because I was not able to pay in one payment, the title to this property isn't in my name and I don't know any other foreigner here with property in there names so I wasn't able to get any information, and asking a local gets you nowhere.

And so as to how much a foreigner can buy, I'm sure there's also restrictions in that department as well, but I haven't got an answer yet.  I will reply when I find out.

#14 ChinaMaina

Posted 03 September 2008 - 01:41 AM

Sure.  I own a villa in suburban Beijing.  The villa (bricks, tiles and all) is mine forever.  The plot was leased by the state to the developer for 80 years, the developer transferred the lease to me for the remaining 77 years.  I'll leave my kids worry for the renewal of the lease.

However, owning property doesn't give you an instant right to reside in it.  I live in Europe now (after 20 years in China), and I get 1-year multiply-entry visas upon presenting the title, but not always.  There is also the problem with renewing my (long expired) Chinese jiasizheng (driver's license)

#15 METHOS

Posted 03 September 2008 - 09:53 AM

From what I understand, it is not very secure. Just like in the States - you don't really 'own' the land. In other words - if the government needs the land for something that they deem beneficial, they will offer you an amount (in China, it is usually a ridiculously low amount that is never fair), and you have to agree to the amount - or you get nothing at all. Also, due to the fact that you are not a Chinese citizen, there is always the possibility that you may have to leave the country - and there's no guarantee that you will be able to enter again. - Just a thought.

I wouldn't recommend buying land in China, unless you are married to a Chinese and/or you are a citizen. Even then, I would be careful as to how much you invest. It just isn't secure enough - IMO.

#16 Southerncalm

Posted 14 September 2008 - 10:10 PM

sorry but some of you have old and dated information
the law changed
no more lease then lose
even the rich Chinese government type want to keep what they buy
the law changed
now you can own
yes you can buy if your not Chinese
and you don't have to open a business like you do in Thailand and play hide and seek with ownership
you buy it you keep it
i already have 1 house and about to buy another
getting more westernized all the time there
as many that are acquiring wealth are the government types
they are changing the laws to allow then to keep what they can make (or take)

just look very close at what you do and whom you buy from
do your due diligence and home work
never assume your getting a straight story from a seller

get a local lawyer the specializes in real estate
most big real estate companies know the updated laws
there are also many secret clauses most westerners don't realize
many real estate companies build in many areas big and small
many will give you a small one free in a slow area when you buy a larger one in the right area

now with the housing crunch in China many Shenzhen real estate companies are actually giving away BWM's for their high cost condos just to unload them
but good luck finding out about it if your not Chinese or don't have the right friends

this is not guessing but facts even if your not aware or dont agree
i assure you

good luck and do your home work

Edited by Southerncalm, 14 September 2008 - 10:12 PM.


#17 yohan

Posted 15 September 2008 - 01:53 AM

View PostSoutherncalm, on 2008-09-15 07:10:57, said:

sorry but some of you have old and dated information
the law changed
....
the law changed
.....
and you don't have to open a business like you do in Thailand and play hide and seek with ownership
.....
get a local lawyer the specializes in real estate
most big real estate companies know the updated laws
there are also many secret clauses most westerners don't realize
Yes the law changed, and the law changed...chinese laws are changing all the time and therefore you cannot trust this country at all. What is a law, changed, updated, with secret clauses by your own words?

And btw, if you own something in China, you still have no right to be in China as a foreigner and they can kick out you anytime.

You cannot own the land, which is on lease, or it is on a company ltd (similar like Thailand) where a state-like company takes 51 percent or more...and such deals are never cheap compared to Thailand...and you cannot buy everywhere in all China. But true, it's not in hiding with grey shareholders...

Quote

many real estate companies build in many areas big and small
many will give you a small one free in a slow area when you buy a larger one in the right area
If this is not corruption!

Quote

but good luck finding out about it if your not Chinese or don't have the right friends
This makes me especially worried...

#18 Jack Fancy

Posted 15 September 2008 - 03:23 AM

If you're talking Shenzhen from experience then you might not be familiar with other provinces... My Chinese family are all Communists and I haven't heard them say anything about new real estate laws yet, and they are always buying property.  My father-in-law just bought another house in Chengdu last month.  Shenzhen has always been a special area for experimenting with change and there are big rumors of late that China will make changes in real estate ownership but I'm pretty sure it hasn't happened yet for the whole country in general.

#19 Southerncalm

Posted 16 September 2008 - 05:19 PM

just because you live someplace or are from there does not mean you know everything

any government can enact a reason followed by a law to get your land from you in any country claiming immanent domain that's true but things get better in many places over time. if your looking for a perfect place let me know if you find it

you need to join a few more groups and get your facts straight before thinking your correct because that's the way it was for decades
also there can be many variations on any law based on the local government
many times you deal with government officials that don't even know their own laws
many of you have dealt with this if you have been in China for any amount of time
go to the same government office and talk to 10 different people on how to do the same task
they will normally never agree how you should do it
if one of them gets you started on any type of document
be sure to try to stick to the same person throughout the process
unless you like starting over many times or giving up

you can join the expats china group on yahoo groups to find out more about the change in law
many there can site the law with links to Chinese government websites with the dates they law changed
if i recall correct it was this year or end of last, but you can look it up
they seem to have done it for 2 reasons
the one they claim is to draw foreign investments
the unofficial reason is that so many government officials have collected allow of wealth in real estate and want to keep it
in their own family without future losses
does not matter why to me, just happy they did it

i will wager than many people don't keep up with all the changes in the law in their local land also
many American laws change often and even when they do or don't most of us only know some of them
and still don't know as much as we think but we go on assuming
which works OK until we get into a jam over it

easy to show examples for any country as well
i grew up in Atlanta and know allot about it
but would be a fool to think or say i know everything about it or Georgia
just because you grow up in an area does not mean you know everything about it

i am not wrong in the law changed
and i am willing to back it up with a large cash bet
not just mouth service since i paid too much for a good lawyer and many Government seals with attached copies of the law
not a bribe

its a fact you can be lazy and cocky and talk crap or actually look it up
the fact someones relative buy and sell land or condos in China or anyplace certainly don't make them an expert
i know many people that bought and sold units in China
some do well
some did well for a long time then lost their ass
others do OK
but almost none of them actually know the law beyond their opinion of it because they have had a level of luck
i know many Chinese after almost 25 years of v

many people in America do many deals or jobs related to buying and selling
but rarely do any of them know ALL the laws

and in China it's RARE for any of the locals (EVEN most of the real estate companies) to actually keep up with the law
i went through 11 real estate lawyer's before i found one that actually knew about the change in the law
and he sent me to a good real estate developer
saying you cant own the land proves for a fact you don't know the law especially the new ones that changed to allow ownership
Thailand and the Philippines are more along those % of building laws on condos and no houses unless you marry a local and put it in their names

Fact....i own a very nice villa in Chongqing  NOW  and was offered the incentives for Shenzhen buy the same developer because i do allot of business there and am looking for a rental at first there
but looks like i will buy in Zhuhai next and commute to a Shenzhen apartment when i need to be there

Fact....they now build American style homes in China where you own the land and the home
not just the home with a lease on the land
so go look for the changes in the law and you will find the new

The real estate company that is up to speed and has offices in many Chinese cities that i bought from
told me about the second house deals, that's a ploy by the developers
not the government, just like here when you buy a big enough house they may give extras to get rid of overstock
especially the real high end ones
If your not Chinese certainly they wont tell you about it if you don't already ask
just like anything else your not a local so if you don't know you pay more

They overprice things so much anyway they can afford to give the real small ones away if you buy a very large one

Anyway i wish you all luck in the future if you buy
just do your homework and use GOOD lawyers (yeah i know how rare they are) and you should be ok
but if you buy from a crook THE SELLER may have a lease clause in it like the old law to take advantage of your not know the change

#20 Jack Fancy

Posted 17 September 2008 - 01:34 AM

FACT.... I never wrote that I knew everything or anything about all of it or some of it or the inbetweens or the slight misgivings or the good intentions of a few or of the masses or yadda yadda yadda...

I simply said that "I haven't heard them say anything about new real estate laws yet".  Now, that is a FACT.

I don't joing Chinese groups because I'm not interested in trying to know everything.  I own one condo, that's all the money I have for right now so it's just not important to me right now.

And, I was referring to what I've read from articles such as this one....
Party Time For China

A bit from the article, referring to a speech made by Zhang Chunxian recently...

"Quan could mean the right to own or ownership. Chinese can now own many things, but not land. To maintain the banner of "socialism", the government still claims that all land and natural resources belong to the state. In practice, when one buys a house or an apartment, the purchaser only rents from the state the right to use the land on which the property is built for a certain period (for residential housing, normally 75 years).

Farmers, too, only "rent" the right to use farmland from the state through the "household contract responsibility system" (normally 30-year contract). Local governments can at any time take back farmland "on behalf of the state", and requisition from farmers without adequate compensation has been the main cause for large protests in recent years.

"To return quan to the people" could therefore mean some changes in the land management system. But it is unlikely that China is ready to privatize land ownership because this would mean abandoning the banner of "socialism with Chinese characteristics"."  


Relax a bit, loosen up, tryin donning that "Southern Calm" a bit more...
It's just from what I read and from I haven't heard from my Commie family...
If you know some specific facts, I'd love to read up on them, just with a different tone attached.

#21 yohan

Posted 17 September 2008 - 05:56 AM

View PostJack Fancy, on 2008-09-17 10:34:51, said:

FACT....
I simply said that "I haven't heard them say anything about new real estate laws yet".  Now, that is a FACT.
.....
It's just from what I read and from I haven't heard from my Commie family...
If you know some specific facts, I'd love to read up on them, just with a different tone attached.
The Chinese Property Law 中华人民共和国物权法  'changed' since 1st. Oct. 2007, however it remains highly controversial.

It's still the same, the state owns all land, and the 'owner' is not into true ownership, but somewhat like into 'Usufruct' - which is the right to use property that belongs to another person.

New Real Estate Laws.... as a fact, I do not know anything about land-ownership for a foreign private individual in China, and as you know, I am living in Japan.

Relationship between China and Japan is considerable, regardless if private or business, and the right, truly to OWN your house AND land in China would be interesting for many people and small businesses here in Japan, especially for Chinese, now holding Japanese citizenship. Chinese real estate brokers and developers would quickly show up with offers in Japan.
But it seems, nothing really changed, which truly improves the situation for a foreign private owner.

If somebody knows more, please let me know...

View PostSoutherncalm, on 2008-09-17 02:19:37, said:

any government can enact a reason followed by a law to get your land from you in any country claiming immanent domain (= EMINENT)
Yes, but this complicated procedure takes decades in Japan and in USA and EU and the government has to pay you off to the present market value of your property, however in China, the bulldozer will go over your house quickly and you have only the right for 'compensation' (which is far off market-value and the law in this sense is totally open for abuse)

Quote

i am not wrong in the law changed
About which laws are you talking? Please specify

Quote

and in China it's RARE for any of the locals (EVEN most of the real estate companies) to actually keep up with the law
i went through 11 real estate lawyer's before i found one that actually knew about the change in the law
and he sent me to a good real estate developer
saying you cant own the land proves for a fact you don't know the law especially the new ones that changed to allow ownership
Fact....i own a very nice villa in Chongqing  NOW
Maybe ... who knows? I cannot find anything about land ownership for a PRIVATE person in the new property law of  1st Oct. 2007, except some possible legal loopholes, like 'ownership by collectives' - but what is a collective? You? Alone?

You write about a developer, this might be the collective owner...

You might compare that legal situation with the ownership of a house in a housing village in Thailand.

As far and where this can be applied for foreigners in China, I have no idea. (In Thailand this is open only for Thai nationals, but in China rules might be different)

In China, as far as I can see up to now, ownership (including private ownership, including foreign individual) is only clearly regulated about condominiums and about the house on a land, but not the land itself.

The new law 2007 about the right to private ownership in China is only clear in issues NOT regarding LAND-ownership.
This includes your income like salaries, homes (the house itself or condominium), items of daily use, tools, trading materials of your shop and - this is new since 1st October 2007 - it includes private savings and investment in business out of your private savings and also inheritance.

I see nothing new about LAND ownership law in China.

If you have clear law reference about it please let me know.

#22 Starseeker

Posted 14 October 2008 - 01:33 PM

I am a bit late on this, but I would agree with Yohan, and Jack here.

Real Estate is a very complicated issue in China, and most Chinese have no clue how it really works.  With the current credit crunch and the rapid ageing population of China, China is losing its international role as the world's work shop, therefore with the extreme speculative nature of the Chinese market, a housing crash could turn ownership into a moot point.  Nobody really knows what they are going to do after the 30-70 years land leases expires, and a lot of people believe that the government hasn't really figured it out yet either.  

Anyway, Foreign ownership is not recommended.  

Unless, of course, you are rich, then everything is fine.

There is a heavy restriction on foreign capital investment in real estate at the moment, due to the fear of a higher housing bubble.  Since you are in Beijing, unless you can afford a new place, expect to pay through the roof as soon as your skin shows up in the second hand market(which is regulated very poorly to say the least).

The current law allows foreigners to get business licenses in China, but it depends on where you are.  Most places will require a USD$100,000.00 - 250,000.00 dollars security deposit in a HK bank in case you decide to bail on your Chinese customers.

Have fun!

#23 yohan

Posted 16 October 2008 - 06:56 AM

View PostStarseeker, on 2008-10-14 22:33:25, said:

I am a bit late on this, but I would agree with Yohan, and Jack here.
.....
Anyway, Foreign ownership is not recommended.  
.....
The current law allows foreigners to get business licenses in China.....
No, you are not 'a bit late' posting your opinion.

I think, this thread which is called 'Can a foreigner own property and home in China?' will not be outdated soon, laws are changing all the time in China and any opinion, any experience is welcome.

While you are in Beijing and Hongkong acording to your profile, Jack is in Lanzhou, Gansu and I am on the other side of the Japanese Sea in Tokyo, Japan.

We are sharing quite the same opinion, as far as I see. Foreign ownership in China is risky and it is not recommended. Reasons are unclear laws, unreasonable prices, frequently unexpected change of various regulations, complicated formalities ...

Should there be a major change in China concerning land-ownership, for sure we would know here in Japan, as there is a significant community of Chinese people living in Japan, many of them are now Japanese citizens, often doing business with China. There would be some offers from China by real estate brokers for retirement, some Japanese developers and banks would offer legal and financial assistance, but there is nothing... nothing at all.

#24 Starseeker

Posted 17 October 2008 - 02:22 AM

Thanks for the thoughtful reply.  Reading over this again reminds me of something, and I can kinda guess what he is talking about.

If I recall correctly, collective ownership of the land is allowed if you join a farming(village) collective and ask to develop the land.  Of course, this depends on the village in question, the village chief(mayor?), and the party secretary for the village.  If everyone in the village agrees and donates parts of their land that was meant for agriculture reserve to you(into the collective), and you donate the funds required to develop it, it can be used for private housing/commercial uses.  Of course, the system is quite convoluted, and there is no guarantee of actual ownership.  It's quite easy for the local party cadres to strike you off the list, since you don't technically belong to the village.  In fact, the reason I found out about this complicated system is because there are some lawsuits concerning the developers suing the farming collhlor  ective over usage and ownership issues.

Anyway, even if one wants to own a place in China, it's not cheap at ALL.

Most of the Urban Beijing and Shanghai are already spoken for, and the going rate is about 10,000 RMB - 25,000 RMB per square meter.  40-60 square meters would be 600,000 RMB and that's just for what Canada considers a bachelor suite.  And not to mention the fact that if you bought it new, you will have to spend upwards to 100,000 RMB to  renovate it.

A decent family suite(apartments, let's not even get into condos or stand alone houses) should be at least around 100-150 square meters.  That would be how much?  At the cheapest price:  1.5 mil RMB.  That's roughly CDN $ 220,000.(of course, this doesn't include any renovation costs, strata costs, tax, maintenance fees, etc)   It's not that bad, right?  If you were making that kind of money in Canada/US or whatever, what are you doing here?  Most multi-nationals already provide their executives with housing, so it's not likely those would need a house unless they want something of their own.  

All that, and it still doesn't mean that it's a good location.  Take Beijing, anything within 2 ring road has severe restriction on development, and most of the big lands from 2-4 rings are already spoken for.  It's like London with its restricted development laws.  You could find a place in Beijing(or any major cities in China) with a decent price, but how close is it to your work or where you would like to hangout/workout/eat out?

Anyway, housing is already complicated in most of the people's home country, so unless someone is interested in settling down a VERY long term (say marrying a Chinese national), it's not recommended.  And whose to say that your spouse doesn't want to go back to your home country?

I have worked here for 6+ years, and I have done enough housing search here to write a novel.  There are a lot of things to consider on TOP of your usual housing dilemmas.  Take your time.

Edited by Starseeker, 17 October 2008 - 02:27 AM.


#25 Jack Fancy

Posted 20 October 2008 - 04:54 AM

Well written Starseeker....

Here's a bit more on the recent development of land "ownership" here...
Land Rights for Farmers

#26 yohan

Posted 20 October 2008 - 05:51 AM

View PostJack Fancy, on 2008-10-20 13:54:07, said:

.....Here's a bit more on the recent development of land "ownership" here...
Thanks for this article.

The interesting point is that the Chinese Communist Government is aware of all these agriculture related problems, and unlike former Communist governments of other countries worldwide, is not ignoring these urgent problems, the government wants to change this and that to get good results. But how? Just tiny steps, no major change?

China might find itself in serious problems in its development programs...changing back from food exporter to food importer is a bad dream and headache for many Chinese politicians.

But of course what is offered by the Chinese government is all and everything else, but nothing, what can be considered as 'ownership' - not even for the Chinese people, not to talk about foreigners....

More likely you might call this to 'sell' and 'buy' a lease -  or to 'sell' and 'buy shares', but this again restricted to a certain group of people. Very complicated.

Quote

The changes don't privatize rural land, which in China is owned by village collectives rather than individual farmers. Farmers are allowed to "sublet, lease, swap and transfer" their land rights, the document says.
It doesn't use the words buy or sell
"The transfer of land rights shall not change the nature of the land's collective ownership, shall not change the use of the land, and must not harm the rights and interests of farmers," the document stated.
I see nothing, which might be useful for a foreigner to enter China and to own property there...

Quote

Few observers think China will make a quick move to U.S.-style factory farming and throw hundreds of millions of farmers off the land.
If you see here any advantages or profit related to any business as a foreigner, you must be a rather powerful company, financially able to accept high risk and unexpected losses and you should know some politicians of your own country and in China who try to keep your business running on a profitable level.

For sure, such consideration and speculation is nothing for the average foreigner. No way.

#27 soutv

Posted 04 December 2008 - 01:25 PM

This whole series of posts makes me think it might be better to just rent!  You can get a serviced office for your business and rent a nice flat or even a serviced apartment, too!  I think it is a questionable time to buy since nobody knows what the market will do and all the info above makes me think it is even more complicated for "foreigners"!   :lol:

#28 YangYang

Posted 04 February 2009 - 12:44 PM

hi all,

I have just signed up just a few minutes ago as the newest members as for now.

I am a Singaporean Chinese,

I have plans to purchase a small place just for my retirement

I have Chengdu in mind.

I am looking for a place not in the busy city instead I am looking for outer skirt of the city.

Something with nice scenary and fresh air just for my retirement life span

I guess the cost will be cheaper.

Just a small setup that have 2 bedrooms and a hall if I can afford if not I will settle for 1 bedroom and a hall

I do have a Chinese girlfriend from Chongqing and currently working and staying in Wuhan.
We intend to stay together and get married.

Intend to pay a downpayment the the rest by monthly installments

So would like the place to be register under my name.

Here just sharing my thoughts

regards

Edited by YangYang, 04 February 2009 - 12:46 PM.


#29 Bobo

Posted 08 May 2009 - 05:36 PM

Yes you can buy a home in China. You need to be a resident for one year before you can buy. IThere are ways around that if you really want to buy sooner.

#30 yohan

Posted 08 May 2009 - 05:48 PM

Everybody says something like that.

But where is the regulation, that you, a foreigner as an individual, can buy LAND in China
(and not only the building on it)? In which law?

All Chinese laws are unclear and controversial, the Chinese property law itself does not give any clear answer to that question.

Or do you mean a condominium? Yes, you can buy a condominium as a foreigner, but property is not cheap in China in a good location, and often other places do not qualify for sale to foreigners.


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