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Chinglish - Funny translation gaffes


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#31 Starseeker

Posted 09 July 2011 - 02:24 PM

btw, if anyone is curious, the Chinese says restaurant.  :bleh:

#32 MrFantabulous

Posted 19 July 2011 - 05:25 AM

Hey Starseeker what is that same character that always gets translated as "F###" on those signs?   "Cao"??  What is the Chinese meaning?  Fried?

#33 MrFantabulous

Posted 20 July 2011 - 02:00 AM

Oh you already answered earlier. . . It's "Gan"

#34 RacNamman

Posted 27 September 2011 - 06:32 AM

Think this is Chinese, might be Nippon, either way, bloody place

#35 Uncle Gweilo

Posted 28 September 2011 - 12:13 AM

^The characters in the background are either Hiragana or Katakana, so that is Japan.

#36 Starseeker

Posted 28 September 2011 - 02:31 PM

I don't know, it seems like the guy got confused.  Was he trying to use Fukkien?  Hokkien?  The current putonghua system uses Fujian, so it would be Fujian street.

#37 Uncle Gweilo

Posted 29 September 2011 - 03:18 PM

Maybe it's pronounced "Fukkien" in Japanese. I'll see if I can nut it out with an online translator later- unless anyone here can actually read Chinese and/or Kanji.

#38 Starseeker

Posted 29 September 2011 - 08:02 PM

Urr...., Gweilo, are you doing this intentionally?  The Chinese characters says Fujian Street/Road.  The pinyin system changed from Cantonese to Mandarin, therefore the confusion.  A lot of earlier works/names in English about China is based on the old system.

#39 Uncle Gweilo

Posted 30 September 2011 - 12:44 AM

^You've got me wrong.

The sign in the background is in Japanese. What I'm thinking is that the sign for "Fukken Street" was transliterated (?) into Romaji/our script by someone Japanese who may have asked a Cantonese, or someoone who speaks Cantonese as opposed to Mandarin, "How do you pronounce that?". For all I know, what we see in Romaji as "Fukken" may be pronounced "Fook-kyen" by a Japanese. Apparently the way we pronounce the name of the Japanese currency (JPY) "yen" is more like "en" in Japanese. There are similarities with Mandarin versus an "English" pronunciation of pinyin, as you are doubtless aware.

I have no idea where this picture was actually taken. It might even be somewhere in PRC or Hong Kong where there is a shop that has it's name in Japanese for "wow" factor, or to attract Japanese tourists.

#40 AnnaSprowls

Posted 30 September 2011 - 06:03 AM

Due to the culture difference and living habits, it is hard to give a faithful translation sometimes.

#41 (Member banned)

Posted 30 September 2011 - 08:52 AM

View PostUncle Gweilo, on 29 September 2011 - 03:18 PM, said:

Maybe it's pronounced "Fukkien" in Japanese. I'll see if I can nut it out with an online translator later- unless anyone here can actually read Chinese and/or Kanji.

福建

Fujian = the pronunciation in Japanese is

FUKKEN

in Japanese writing it is in Hiragana:

ふっけん


http://www.baycityma...map_english.pdf

I think this picture was taken in Yokohama Chinatown, check the map link above position on the map is H5

There are similar roads there, for other Chinese places (Shanghai Road, Kanton Road etc.), and there is also a Fukken Road in English and Japanese (Chinese) characters existing.

#42 Uncle Gweilo

Posted 30 September 2011 - 11:19 AM

Cheers, Yohan.

#43 (Member banned)

Posted 30 September 2011 - 02:24 PM

View PostUncle Gweilo, on 29 September 2011 - 03:18 PM, said:

..... I'll see if I can nut it out with an online translator later- unless anyone here can actually read Chinese and/or Kanji.

The best Online-translator:

http://www.ocn.ne.jp/translation/

OCN is a large internet network in Japan.

This is maybe the best and free of charge online translator for Japanese, Chinese simplified, Chinese traditional, English and Korean.

It is operated by the large NTT landline/mobile phone company,
http://www.ntt.co.jp/

together with the big dictionaries/database of KODENSHA, a large publishing company.
http://www.kodensha.jp/

If you don't know it yet, give it a try.

View PostUncle Gweilo, on 30 September 2011 - 12:44 AM, said:


The sign in the background is in Japanese.

.....

For all I know, what we see in Romaji as "Fukken" may be pronounced "Fook-kyen" by a Japanese.

Apparently the way we pronounce the name of the Japanese currency (JPY) "yen" is more like "en" in Japanese.


No, for a Japanese the pronunciation is FUKKEN
There is no other way to pronunciate it in Japanese.

福 = FUK(U)
福島 = Fukushima (well-known because of the nuclear power plant!)
There are many other places in Japan using this Kanji and this pronunciation,
Fukuoka, Fukui, Fukue
福岡 福井 福江
and also Japanese names etc.
Fukuda
福田

The Japanese use it also for some Chinese places or some definitions related to China.

福州 Fukushu (Fuzhou City)
福建 Fukken (Fujian)
福佬語 Fukurougo (Taiwan-Chinese, Min-Nan-Hokkien)

-------------------------------------------------

建 = KEN
is widely used, for example as a male first name, but sometimes also for (old, history etc.) Chinese names

建康 = Kenkou (Nanking)

建文 = Kenbun = in Chinese Jian-wen) (Ming-Dynasty, 1400)

In modern Japanese the character of KEN (tate-) means mostly something which is related to buildings, constructions...
建物 tatemono (building)
建材 kenzai (construction materials)
建築家 kenchikuka (Architect)

Please come back with any question.

About YEN and EN

Originally the Japanese kana had more characters

a i u e o
あいうえお
ka ki ku ke ko
かきくけこ
...
ya yi yu ye yo
やゆよ

But
YI and YE are now obsolete and were replaced with i and e

so YEN becomes EN

円 えん
圓 えん (full form of this character)

Do not mix this up with
園 えん

same pronunciation, but it means 'garden, park'
園庭 = entei = garden

As a fact, Japanese writing is often similar to Chinese writing.

Let us see. No problem for a Chinese to understand this, I guess.
Japanese pronunciation : Engei-shokubutsu-beiyou-cho (which means 'tree nursery' in English)

園芸植物培養場

#44 Starseeker

Posted 30 September 2011 - 02:31 PM

lol, hand it to Yohan to be precise in these things.  The interesting thing is that in Hokkien, the Fujianese dialect, Fujian is pronounced as Fukkien.  Of course, this part of the Chinese language is complicated and difficult to comprehend.  Fujian itself also has multiple dialects that are sometimes even unintelligible to each other.  Southern Chinese dialects are often much more difficult to learn or understand for most people who only learned Mandarin.  Some words sounds similar across the board, but if you fall into that trap, you can get into trouble saying things you shouldn't.  

Off the top of my head, Shanghainese, Hokkien (splits into 3 main groups), Cantonese, Teochew, Hangzhouese and Wenzhounese been the major language groups in the South.  Most of it due to economical and cultural influences.


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